info@aecya.org

Possible treatment of seriously ill patients with COVID-19, from the immunological point of view

Tratamiento Covid 19 laboratorio

Possible treatment of seriously ill patients with COVID-19, from the immunological point of view

Prof. Marta Navarro-Zorraquino.

Department of Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetricia.

Universidad de Zaragoza (España).

Miembro de la Academia Europea de Ciencias y Artes 

 

COVID-19 pandemic is leading to a large increase in mortality in the elderly population, concerning the mortality rate observed in patients below 70 years infected with”. The mortality rate is dramatically alarming in the case of patients older than 80 years, about 30% compared to the total population of patients infected by COVID-19.

From an immunological point of view, I do think that it must be pointed out this: elderly patients can present significant alterations in their immune response when their immune system is challenged by infections, accidental or provoked trauma (in the case of surgical interventions, especially those that cause greater tissue damage). Since 1975, our research group has conducted numerous studies on elderly patients undergoing accidental or surgical trauma and infection; our results have led us to the following conclusions: defects in the immune response in the elderly may be related to thymus involution, but above all, to the alteration of the balance between “pro-inflammatory response” and “anti-inflammatory response” mediated by regulatory lymphocytes.

When macrophages or any others “antigen-presenting cells” are stimulated, the quintessential “pro-inflammatory” cytokines are released: IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNFs, IFNγ and PAF (activation factor platelet), etc. These cytokines have a relevant role in the inflammatory process and they, in turn, can give rise to the so-called “cytokine storm”, the consequence of which is the “systemic inflammatory response syndrome” (SIRS) and finally the ”multi-organ failure” (MOF), conducting to death.

As Niels Jerne said: “any stimulus capable of producing an immune response, causes a reaction comparable to the transmission of the waves that can be observed in a pond when a stone is thrown to the immune system so that the variation in the receptor site of the stimulus it is transmitted to all places”. But in the “SIRS” this allegory reaches a dramatic expression and encompasses not only the network of signals, which intersect and intersect within the immune system, but between the different systems (coagulation, fibrinolytic, cyanines, ac. arachidonic, leukotriene thromboxane), the immune system itself (complement system, circulating immune complexes ICC, ADCC, NK cells, immune adaptive response: CTLs and cytokines). For this reason, the lack of control of the servo-mechanisms that maintain homeostasis in any of the mentioned systems can cause an unstoppable situation of mediator release which irretrievably leads to tissue damage.

The lung is the organ most sensitive to aggression resulting from phenomena triggered during the “SIRS” of any kind, due to the involvement of the immune system on other systems and the various mediators in the “respiratory distress syndrome”(ARDS) becoming “severe acute respiratory syndrome” (SARS). In 1992, Welhourn and Young carried out a review study in which they reported on acute lung injury caused by neutrophils, macrophages, and mediators of inflammation during septic shock. We know that most viruses have a particular tropism, attacking the organ of their choice, the “coronary-virus” invade the respiratory system. At this time, we know that “the new COV-19” (SARS-CoV-2) invades the lung selectively. However, the kidney and liver are also involved in MOF and death.

Let us also remember here that when the macrophage or any other “antigen-presenting cell” is stimulated, the quintessential “pro-inflammatory” cytokines are released: IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNFs, IFNγ and PAF (platelet activation factor). These cytokines have a relevant role in the inflammatory process and they, in turn, can give rise to the so-called “cytokine storm”, the consequence of which is “systemic inflammatory response syndrome” SIRS and MOF

Despite the undoubted role of IL-1, IL-8 and TNFs in the “SIRS” pathophysiology and “MOF”, in terms of cytokine release and effects, all the attention of the last 6 years has been focused on IL -6. The interest in this cytokine lies in the close relationship found between its elevation in serum and different situations that can lead SIRS

Actually, IL-6 is a family of phospho-glycoproteins with different molecular weights, the biological meaning of which has not yet been completely clarified, so its exact role in the pathophysiology of “SIRS” is still unclear, however, its significant production and release during the “cytokine storm” is beyond question.

In patients with COVID-19, the relationship between the degree of the immune response against “SARS-CoV-2” and IL-6 level found in their serum, makes the quantification of IL-6 especially interesting during clinical COVID-19 infection; in fact, it is already being determined in some recently starting studies. We think, that IgA, IgE and IL-6 measures in peripheral blood together with the clinical course of this disease could be recommended to know the severity of this disease in each period.

From the point of view of the immune response, we think that we should avoid, with all the available means to date, that elderly patients do not trigger “cytokine storm” and “SARS”. It would be desirable that, at the beginning of the infection (1-4 first days), these patients were treated with affected anti-inflammatory drugs, without corticosteroids (example: “metamizole”), and with substances that block the intracellular penetration of “SARS-CoV-2” (example: hydroxy-chloroquine). And 5-7 days post-infection: when the viral load increases (virus replication, rapid generation time and a large number of particles produced), treatment with the serum of infected and healed patients, containing antibodies against “SARS- CoV-2” could be useful.

However, the best treatment could be the use of “bio-drugs” preventing “cytokine storm” by restoring the balance: “inflammatory response”/ “anti-inflammatory response”.

In this sense, the “regulatory T cells” of the immune response play a very important role:

CD4+25+Foxp3+ cells and CD8+25+Foxp3+ cells produce the main regulatory cytokine, the “transforming grow factor” (TGF β1). We think that European research projects on this topic should be developed. Now, since these “bio-drugs” are not currently in the market, antiviral drugs, and monoclonal antibodies are being used.


Traducción al castellano.

“Posible tratamiento de pacientes gravemente enfermos con COVID-19, desde el punto de vista inmunológico”

La pandemia de COVID-19 está provocando un gran aumento de la mortalidad en la población de edad avanzada, con respecto a la tasa de mortalidad observada en pacientes menores de 70 años infectados con “. La tasa de mortalidad es dramáticamente alarmante en el caso de pacientes mayores de 80 años, alrededor del 30% en comparación con la población total de pacientes infectados por COVID-19. Desde un punto de vista inmunológico, creo que debe señalarse esto: los pacientes de edad avanzada pueden presentar alteraciones significativas en su respuesta inmunitaria cuando su sistema inmunitario se ve afectado por infecciones, traumas accidentales o provocados (en el caso de intervenciones quirúrgicas, especialmente los que causan mayor daño tisular).

Desde 1975, nuestro grupo de investigación ha llevado a cabo numerosos estudios en pacientes de edad avanzada que sufren traumas e infecciones accidentales o quirúrgicas; nuestros resultados nos han llevado a las siguientes conclusiones: los defectos en la respuesta inmune en los ancianos pueden estar relacionados con la involución del timo, pero sobre todo, con la alteración del equilibrio entre “respuesta pro-inflamatoria” y “respuesta antiinflamatoria” mediada por linfocitos reguladores. Cuando se estimulan los macrófagos o cualquier otra “célula presentadora de antígeno”, se liberan las citoquinas “pro-inflamatorias” por excelencia: IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IFNg   y PAF (factor de activación plaquetario), Estas citoquinas tienen un papel relevante en el proceso inflamatorio y, a su vez, pueden dar lugar a la llamada “tormenta de citoquinas”, cuya consecuencia es el “síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica” (SIRS) y finalmente el ” fallo multi-orgánico ”(MOF), conduciendo a la muerte.

Como dijo Niels Jerne (1974): “cualquier estímulo capaz de producir una respuesta inmune, provoca una reacción comparable a la transmisión de las ondas que se puede observar en un estanque cuando se arroja un piedara, de modo que en el sistema inmune la variación en el sitio del receptor del estímulo se transmite a todos los lugares “. Pero en el “SIRS” esta alegoría alcanza una expresión dramática y abarca no solo la red de señales, que se cruzan e intersectan dentro del sistema inmune, sino entre los diferentes sistemas (coagulación, fibrinolíticos, cianinas, ac. Araquidónico, leucotrienos tromboxano), el sistema inmune en sí mismo (sistema del complemento, complejos inmunes circulantes ICC, ADCC, células NK, respuesta inmune adaptativa: CTL y citoquinas). Por esta razón, la falta de control de los servomecanismos que mantienen la homeostasis en cualquiera de los sistemas mencionados puede causar una situación imparable de liberación del mediador que conduce irremediablemente a daño tisular. 

El pulmón es el órgano más sensible a la agresión resultante de fenómenos desencadenados durante el “SIRS” de cualquier tipo, debido a la participación del sistema inmune en otros sistemas y en los diversos mediadores en el “síndrome agudo de dificultad respiratoria” (ARDS) que se convierte en ” síndrome respiratorio agudo severo ”(SARS). En 1992, Welhourn y Young llevaron a cabo un estudio de revisión en el que informaron sobre la lesión pulmonar aguda causada por neutrófilos, macrófagos y mediadores de la inflamación durante el shock séptico. Sabemos que la mayoría de los virus tienen un tropismo particular, atacando el órgano de su elección, el “virus coronario” invade el sistema respiratorio. En este momento, sabemos que “el nuevo COV-19” (SARS-CoV-2) invade el pulmón selectivamente. Sin embargo, el riñón y el hígado también están involucrados en el MOF y la muerte.

Recordemos también aquí que cuando se estimula el macrófago o cualquier otra “célula presentadora de antígeno”, se liberan las citoquinas “pro-inflamatorias” por excelencia: IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IFNg y PAF ( factor de activación plaquetaria). Estas citoquinas tienen un papel relevante en el proceso inflamatorio y, a su vez, pueden dar lugar a la llamada “tormenta de citoquinas”, cuya consecuencia es el “síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica” SIRS y MOF

A pesar del papel indudable de IL-1, IL-8 y TNF en la fisiopatología “SIRS” y “MOF”, en términos de liberación y efectos de citoquinas, toda la atención de los últimos 6 años se ha centrado en IL -6. El interés en esta citoquina radica en la estrecha relación que se encuentra entre su elevación en el suero y las diferentes situaciones que pueden provocar SIRS.

En realidad, IL-6 es una familia de fosfo-glicoproteínas con diferentes pesos moleculares, cuyo significado biológico aún no se ha aclarado por completo, por lo que su papel exacto en la fisiopatología de “SIRS” aún no está claro, sin embargo, su producción y liberación significativas durante la “tormenta de citoquinas” está fuera de toda duda.

En pacientes con COVID-19, la relación entre el grado de respuesta inmune contra “SARS-CoV-2” y el nivel de IL-6 que se encuentra en su suero, hace que la cuantificación de IL-6 sea especialmente interesante durante la infección clínica con COVID-19; de hecho, ya se está determinando en algunos estudios que comienzan recientemente. Creemos que las medidas de IgA, IgE e IL-6 en sangre periférica junto con el curso clínico de esta enfermedad podrían recomendarse para conocer la gravedad de esta enfermedad en cada período.

Desde el punto de vista de la respuesta inmune, creemos que debemos evitar, con todos los medios disponibles hasta la fecha, que los pacientes de edad avanzada no desencadenen “tormenta de citoquinas” y “SARS”. Sería deseable que, al comienzo de la infección (1-4 primeros días), estos pacientes afectados fueran tratados con medicamentos anti-inflamatorios, no corticosteroides (ejemplo: “metamizol”) y con sustancias que bloqueen la penetración intracelular de “SARS-CoV-2” (ejemplo: hidroxi-cloroquina). Y 5-7 días después de la infección: cuando aumenta la carga viral (replicación del virus, tiempo de generación rápido y gran cantidad de partículas producidas), el tratamiento con suero de pacientes infectados y curados, que contiene anticuerpos contra “SARS-CoV-2” podría ser útil.

Sin embargo, el mejor tratamiento podría ser el uso de “biofármacos” que prevengan la “tormenta de citoquinas” restaurando el equilibrio: “respuesta inflamatoria” / “respuesta antiinflamatoria”.

En este sentido, las “células T reguladoras” de la respuesta inmune juegan un papel muy importante: Las células CD4 + 25 + Foxp3 + y las células CD8 + 25 + Foxp3 + producen la principal citoquina reguladora, el “factor de crecimiento transformante” (TGF b1). Creemos que deberían desarrollarse proyectos de investigación europeos sobre este tema. Ahora, dado que estos “biofármacos” no están actualmente en el mercado, se están utilizando fármacos antivirales y anticuerpos monoclonales.

Prof. Marta Navarro-Zorraquino.

Department of Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetricia.

Universidad de Zaragoza (España).

Miembro de la Academia Europea de Ciencias y Artes